Song Wheel

Putting all the spokes in your teaching wheel!

Archive for the ‘Speech Pieces’ Category

In and Out (chant)

Posted by lbbartolomeo on August 19, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-08-19 at 11.01.21 AM

A great chant to teach quarter note, quarter rest, and beat bonding!

  1.  Echo speak each line of the chant as you keep a pat/clap beat.  The 2 part pat/clap beat is preferable over a single body percussion choice (patting, clapping) because it forces the children to NOT disregard the rests!
  2. Getting young children to pass a ball or bean bag to a beat is challenging.  The following method has worked so well for me.  Sit in a circle and give everyone a number, with the teacher having the LAST number.  This means you are sitting between the last student number and the number 1 student.
  3. Explain to the students that the ball has to be in their hands on THEIR number.  (If someone passes it too slowly or too quickly, you can explain why they didn’t have possession of the ball on their own number)

    Using numbers reinforces steady beat, so students aren’t inclined to HOLD the ball or RUSH the ball.

  4. With students’ eyes on the person with the ball, which in the beginning is YOU, they clap and speak “1” when you hand it to the child next to you.  This is an important step because it forces them to watch who has the ball, to know when to begin.  They continue counting and clapping until the ball gets back to you.  I like to do this step twice to solidify the idea that everyone has a number (beat).  If all goes well after two practices, go on to the next step.  If not, repeat again.
  5. This time, tell the Ss to THINK the numbers as they clap.
  6. The final step is to begin passing the ball as you say the chant.
  7. The student who has the ball on the last word “out”, is out, gives the ball to the next person, and leaves the circle to go get a non-pitched percussion instrument to play the beat.  I have them sit a couple of feet behind their normal circle spot.
  8. Everyone is reminded to watch the person with the ball so that they know when to begin the chant again.
  9. In the beginning, most are chatting and having fun and aren’t watching, but I encourage the person with the ball to start anyway, and then I make a BIG deal about the people who clap the very first beat and say the first word of the chant!  This increases watchfulness GREATLY!  Then the game is totally student-directed with the teacher as an observer, assessor, and occasional referee! 🙂 You can SO easily mark a steady beat assessment watching this game!!!

If you want to see MORE great ideas about this chant, check out the information at one of my favorite sites-Beth’s Notes!

Rhythm Practice

I use a blank chart to prepare, present, and practice rhythms.

  1.  Present the 16 beats of the chant as students speak and pat/clap the chant, T pointing to the beats.
  2. Repeat, but this time have students only SPEAK the chant, discovering which beats have NO words on them.
  3. Change those into RESTS and speak with syllables of your choice.  I use “ta” and “sh”.
  4. Body Percussion—Clap on quarters, snap on rests.  How else could we do it?
  5. Movement—Step on quarters, jump on rests.  How else could we do it?
  6. Percussion—Everyone will get a percussion instrument and working with a partner, one will play the quarters and the other play the rests.  Pick an instrument for the rest that has a light sound.  Partners will practice and then share with the class.  After everyone has shared, have students share which instrument combo was their favorite and why they chose it.
  7. You could have students choose wood and metal combinations or combinations of their choice that weren’t in the same family.  Many options here.
  8. Have partners reverse what they played.  Question-Which was your favorite?  Why?

Making UP Rhythms

  1. There are 13 quarter notes and 3 rests in the chant.  Re-order the notes into a NEW piece.  Partners can work together and then perform for the class.  A great time to talk about measures and 4/4.

Rhythm Writing

  1. Write the rhythm of the chant using human notes!  16 students will lie down on the floor, 4 rows each with 4 beats.  Then the notes will “perform” the chant saying rhythm syllables and/or the words of the chant.  Those Ss watching will then take someone’s place and repeat the “performance”.
  2. Students take dry erase boards, paper/pencil, whatever you use, and write out the chant’s rhythm.  This is a great time to practice writing quarter notes and rests even before you write out the chant.  Students can then touch each beat saying the notes or the words of the chant to make the connection between what they see and what they hear.

 

 

Advertisements

Posted in Quarter note, quarter rest, Speech Pieces, Steady beat | Leave a Comment »

NFL Rap

Posted by lbbartolomeo on August 18, 2013

Screen shot 2013-08-18 at 5.55.09 PM

Since I live in Indianapolis, the ending fits!  “Colts, Go Blue!”  But you can re-arrange it to fit YOUR needs!

Screen shot 2013-08-18 at 6.00.07 PM

Some of the team rhythms can be changed to more naturally fit the way they are pronounced.  This is just how I laid them out.

HOW I USE THIS RAP!

1.  Rhythmic canon

2.  Rhythms quarter, two eighths, quarter rest

3.  Transferred to drums, adding ostinati

4.  Transferred to pitched percussion for improvisation

 

 

 

Posted in Canons/Rounds, Improvisation, Speech Pieces, Two eighths/Qt. | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

 
Happy Bones

Searching for answers in my osteoporosis journey.

Song Wheel

Putting all the spokes in your teaching wheel!

indy bird photographer

birding and nature notes from central Indiana and beyond

Diane Ravitch's blog

A site to discuss better education for all

Sing Books with Emily, the Blog

Sing Books with Emily: Celebrating the Wonderful World of Illustrated Song in Singable Picture Books

SallyPickering's Blog

Musings from the Middle Aged!

37 people can't be wrong...

Putting all the spokes in your teaching wheel!

Take Note

The Official Blog of Sheet Music Plus

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.